Friday, May 22, 2015

Protesters converge on Nestlé bottling plants in Sacramento and LA/Photo essay of protest







Protesters converge on Nestlé bottling plants in Sacramento and LA 

by Dan Bacher 

The outrage over the bottling of California water by Nestlé, Walmart and other big corporations during a record drought has become viral on social media and national and international media websites over the past couple of months. 

On May 20, people from across the state converged on two Nestlé bottling plants - one in Sacramento and other in Los Angeles - demanding that the Swiss-based Nestlé corporation halt its bottling operations during the state's record drought. 

Wednesday's protest, led by the California-based Courage Campaign, was the third in Sacramento over the past year. The first two protests were "shut downs" this March and last October organized by the Crunch Nestlé Alliance. For my report on the March protest, go to: http://www.truth-out.org/speakout/item/29947-activists-shut-down-nestle-water-bottling-plant-in-sacramento

For over an hour Wednesday, over 50 protesters held signs and marched as they chanted, "Hey hey, ho ho, Nestlé Waters has got to go," "Water is a human right! Don't let Nestlé win this fight," and "Keep our water in the ground, Nestle Waters get out of town." 

An eight-foot-long banner at the Sacramento protest read: "Nestlé, 515,000 people say leave California's precious water in the ground," referring to the total number of signatures on the petitions. 

At the protests, activists delivered the 515,000 signatures from people in California and around the nation who signed onto a series of petitions to Nestlé executives, Governor Brown, the California State Water Resources Control Board and the U.S. Forest Service urging an immediate shutdown of Nestlé's bottling operations across the state. 

The petitions were circulated by Courage Campaign, SumOfUs.org, CREDO, Corporate Accountability International, Avaaz, Food & Water Watch, Care2, Change.org and Daily Kos. 

In Sacramento, local activists and residents joined residents from San Francisco and Oakland who took a bus protest outside Nestlé's bottling plant at 8670 Younger Creek Drive. View photos from the Sacramento protest here:http://www.flickr.com/photos/132616837@N02/sets/72157653159511042bottling in California. 

Jessica Lopez, the Chair of the Concow Maidu Tribe, participated in the protest with her daughter, Salvina Adeline Santos Jesus Lopez. 

"I stand here in solidarity with everybody here demanding the protection of our water rights," said Lopez. "Nestle needs to stop bottling water during this drought. Why have they obtained their current permits to pump city water?" 

Tim Molina, Strategic Campaign Organizer for the California-based Courage Campaign, said to the crowd, "Today we are saying enough is enough. With people across California doing their part to conserve water -- it's time that Nestlé did the right thing and put people over profits - by immediately halting their water bottling operations across the State." 

"If Nestlé won't do what's right to protect California's precious water supply, it is up to Governor Brown and the California Water Resource Control Boards to step in and stop this blatant misuse of water during our State's epic drought," he said. 

"Bottling public water for private profit doesn't make sense for communities and it doesn't make sense for the environment," said Sandra Lupien, Western Region Communications Manager at Food & Water Watch, also at the protest in Sacramento. "During a historic drought crisis, it is utter madness to allow corporations like Nestlé to suck our dwindling groundwater and sell it for thousands of times what it pays. Putting a halt to water bottling in California is a no-brainer and Governor Jerry Brown must stand up to protect Californians' public resource." 

After the activists gave the petitions to Nestlé representatives at the Sacramento plant, the Nestlé supervisor presented the organizers with a letter from Tim Brown, President and CEO of Nestlé Waters North America, responding to a letter from the Courage Campaign. 

Brown wrote, "Keep in mind that beverages consumed in California but not bottled in the state must be shipped a longer distance, which has its own drawbacks, such as the environmental impact of transportation. Sourcing water in California provides water with a lower carbon footprint, which has a beneficial environmental impact. The entire bottled industry accounts for 0.02 percent of the annual water used in California." 

The company said it also would like to engage in "thoughtful dialogue" with the water bottling opponents. 

"We appreciate the opportunity to engage in thoughtful dialogue - and in meaningful action - to address California's water challenges. We would welcome the opportunity to speak with you - in person or over the phone - to advance our shared desire for a more sustainable California. We are hopeful that the public discussion we are all engaged in around water use - including your efforts - leads to positive collective action." 

In 2014, Nestlé Waters used about 50 million gallons from the Sacramento municipal water supply to produce "Nestlé Pure Life Purified Drinking Water" and for other plant operations, according to a statement from Nestlé Waters. To read the city of Sacramento's responses to my questions about the Nestlé bottling plant's use of city water, go to: http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/04/10/1376873/-City-of-Sacramento-s-responds-to-my-questions-about-Nest

Nestlé Waters is not the only corporation bottling Sacramento water during the drought. A report on CBS TV earlier this month revealed that Walmart bottled water also comes from the city of Sacramento's drinking water supply. (http://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2015/05/08/wal-mart-bottled-water-comes-from-sacramento-municipal-supply

In Los Angeles, local activists and residents were joined by people from Orange County and Long Beach who took buses to protest outside Nestlé's bottling plant at 1560 East 20th Street. 

The representatives from consumer, environmental and human rights groups who participated in the protest, like at the protest in Sacramento, blasted the corporation for making millions off bottled water during the drought when urban users are seeing increasing restrictions on their water use. 

"As California's water supplies dry up, Nestlé continues to make millions selling bottled water and that's outrageous!" explained Liz McDowell, campaigner for SumOfUs.org. "We've stood up to Nestlé exploiting natural resources for profit in the past everywhere from Pakistan to Canada, and now the global community is speaking out before California runs completely dry." 

The Desert Sun recently reported that Nestlé was bottling water in desert and drought-stricken areas of California and selling it for a big profit, even though its permit for water pipelines and wells in the San Bernardino National Forest had expired in 1988. Nestlé currently extracts water from at least a dozen natural springs in California for its Arrowhead and Pure Life brands.(http://www.desertsun.com/story/news/environment/2015/04/11/nestle-bottled-water-california-drought-water/25621915/

A majority of people in the U.S. believe Nestlé should stop bottling in California, according to a recent poll. However, in spite of the increasing public outcry, Nestlé CEO Tim Brown, when asked about the controversy, said he wished the corporation could bottle more water from California. 

When asked in an interview with KPCC radio if he would stop bottling water in the state, Brown replied, "Absolutely not. In fact, if I could increase it, I would." 

Zack Malitz, Campaign Manager at CREDO Action, accused Nestlé of "profiteering at the expense of the public interest." 

"In the midst of an historic drought with no end in sight, it is wildly irresponsible for Nestlé to extract vast amounts of California's water," said Malitz. 

"For decades, Nestlé has demonstrated a blatant disregard for local communities and the environment," said Erin Diaz, the campaign director at Corporate Accountability International's Think Outside the Bottle campaign. "In response to community concerns about its backdoor political dealings and environmental damage, Nestle has poured millions into PR and greenwashing campaigns. But Nestle's money can't wash away its abysmal track record, and Californians are demanding an end to Nestle's abusive practices." 

John Tye, Campaign Director, Avaaz, concluded, "Families across the American West are already paying a steep price for mismanagement and scandalous selloffs of public resources. It's time for California, and Governor Brown, to set a strong example for conservation and responsive regulation. Tens of thousands of people across the country are tired of watching companies like Nestlé profit at the expense of the taxpayers." 

The protests take place as Governor Jerry Brown continues to push his plan to construct two massive tunnels under the Delta, potentially the most environmentally destructive protect in California history. The twin tunnels would divert massive quantities of water from the Sacramento River to be used by corporate agribusiness interests irrigating drainage impaired land on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley, as well as to Southern California water agencies and oil companies conducting fracking and steam injection operations. 

The construction of the tunnels would hasten the extinction of winter-run Chinook salmon, Central Valley steelhead, Delta and longfin smelt, green sturgeon and other imperiled fish species, as well as threaten the salmon and steelhead populations on the Trinity and Klamath rivers. 

But the tunnels plan is just one of the many environmentally destructive policies of the Brown administration. Governor Brown has presided over record water exports and fish kills at the Delta pumping facilities; promotes the expansion of fracking in California; pursues water policies that have driven Delta smelt, winter-run Chinook salmon and other fish species closer to extinction; and authorized the completion of questionable "marine protected areas" created under the helm of a big oil lobbyist during the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) Initiative. (http://www.truth-out.org/speakout/item/30452-the-extinction-governor-rips-the-green-mask-off-his-tunnels-plan

The groups are now urging everybody to sign the pledge by Daily Kos, Courage Campaign and Corporate Accountability International: Do not drink bottled water from Nestlé: http://www.dailykos.com/campaigns/1224 

This is the text of the pledge to Nestlé Corporation: 

"I pledge to choose tap water instead of buying the following Nestlé products: Acqua Panna, Arrowhead, Deer Park, Ice Mountain, Nestea, Nestlé Pure Life, Ozarka, Perrier, Poland Spring, Resource, S. Pellegrino, Sweet Leaf, Tradewinds and Zephyrhills." 

For more information, go to: http://www.couragecampaign.org/site/page/photos-major-protests-in-la-and-sacramento-demand-nestle-stop-water-bottlin



2. Photo essay of protest in Sacramento: http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2015/05/21/18772572.php

Tim Molina of the Courage Campaign speaks at the protest at the Nestlé bottling plant in Sacramento. Photo by Dan Bacher 

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People from across the state converged on two Nestlé bottling plants - one in Sacramento and other in Los Angeles - on May 20 demanding that the Swiss-based Nestlé corporation halt its bottling operations during the state's record drought. Over 50 people from the Sacramento and Bay Areas attended the protest in Sacramento. The following are some of the photos that I took covering the protest in Sacramento.

§Salvina Lopez
by Dan Bacher Thursday May 21st, 2015 8:27 PM

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Salvina Adeline Santos Jesus Lopez, the daughter of Concow Maidu Tribe Chair Jessica Lopez, in front of the water bottling plant in Sacramento. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§Jessica Lopez
by Dan Bacher Thursday May 21st, 2015 8:27 PM

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Jessica Lopez, Chair of the Concow Maidu Tribe, with her daughter in front of the Nestlé bottling plant. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§Leave it in the ground!
by Dan Bacher Thursday May 21st, 2015 8:27 PM

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The big banner in front of the plant on May 20. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§Marching at the plant
by Dan Bacher Thursday May 21st, 2015 8:27 PM

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After marching in front of the entrance of the bottling plant, the organizers and activists delivered the petitions to Nestlé management. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§Francisco Dominguez
by Dan Bacher Thursday May 21st, 2015 8:27 PM

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Francisco Dominguez, photojournalist, and another activist march in front of Nestlé. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§Jay
by Dan Bacher Thursday May 21st, 2015 8:27 PM

Jay, a longtime local activist, urges Nestlé to turn off its faucet. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§United Native Americans
by Dan Bacher Thursday May 21st, 2015 8:27 PM

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Quanah Brightman of United Native Americans in front of the Nestlé plan. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§John Reiger
by Dan Bacher Thursday May 21st, 2015 8:27 PM

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John Reiger of Veterans for Peace. Photo by Dan Bacher.
§Sandra Lupien
by Dan Bacher Thursday May 21st, 2015 8:27 PM

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Sandra Lupien (right) of Food and Water Watch holds a sign at the protest. Photo by Dan Bacher.

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Moises 'Political Economy from the Zapatista Communities II'

Political Economy from the Zapatista Communities II

Words of Subcomandante Insurgente Moisés. May 5, 2015


Good afternoon to everyone, compañeras, compañeros, brothers and sisters.
In response to what we have been listening to yesterday, and the day before, we have been commenting in the commission of compañeros and compañeras of the CCRI, that it seems to us that you can see there what it is that we want to do. This is the reason all of us are here, and if we haven’t been dreaming or sleeping, then we are thinking about the things that we have discussed, what the compas and brothers and sisters already brought up and talked about. They have already told us a lot about what this hydra is. So the question is what do we need to do against it?
Organize ourselves. When we give this response, organize ourselves, it means that our brain is already telling us what must be done first, and then second, and third, and fourth, and so on. And so, it’s an idea, when it is in your head it is an idea. Now, when you move your tongue, then it is in your words. What is still missing is action, that is, to organize. Now when you are organizing yourselves, watch out, because it isn’t going to come out like you thought in the idea, or like you said in the word. You are going to begin to encounter a lot of barriers, a lot of challenges.
Because if we don’t organize ourselves, we’re going to get to the year 2100, well, that is, those of us who are going to get there, and we’ll still be talking about ideas, words, and thoughts while capitalism has kept on, where were those of us who criticized capitalism so much? Where will we be if that’s how things are?
Ok, this is what we were reflecting on among the compas of the CCRI, of the Sixth Commission of the EZLN.

UN Denounces Criminalization of Indigenous Community Radios in Guatemala

UN Denounces the Criminalization of Indigenous Community Radios in Guatemala

On May 15, 2015, the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) denounced the criminalization of Indigenous community radio stations in Guatemala, after submitting its observations on the country, in Geneva, according to the International Convention on the matter.
"The criminalization of community radio, and subsequent detention of Indigenous journalists and closure of radio stations, which are an integral part in the communication of Indigenous peoples, is a new phenomenon" as explained by American citizen, Carlos Manuel Vazquez, one of 18 independent experts appointed by this Committee, who acted as rapporteur for the Guatemalan case, held in late April, and whose recommendations were made public today.

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Mohawk Nation News 'S.S. GOOD MESSAGE, POWER & PEACE'

.

“S.S. GOOD MESSAGE, POWER & PEACE”.


mnnlogo1

Please post & distribute. Nia:wen.
MNN. May 20, 2015. It appears that The League of Nations, now known as the United Nations, is being seen for what it is. It’s the New World Order. It looks like the end is near for NATO and the bankers’ global fascist agenda.
All Aboard!
All Aboard!

Confederacy sent Deskaheh to spread the Great Peace.
Confederacy sent Deskaheh to spread the Peace.
In 1923 the League of Nations was convened in the Hague. They refused to hear our representative, Deskaheh. Instead the ongwe’hon:weh were placed on an accelerated path of genocide, particularly in Canada. Read the following link:
ongwe'hon:weh: "Who has the immigrant problem?"
The media is integrated with the military in concentration camp America.
Dekanawida explained to the people that if they are to find peace they must follow the laws of nature, because all of life is derived from these laws. He said they must respect each other, other nations and all creation in order to bring about peace and harmony among themselves and throughout the world.

These 133 nations are beginning a real revolution as thahoketoteh sings:


MNN Mohawk Nation News kahentinetha@mohawknationnews.com more news, books, workshops, to donate and sign up for MNN newsletters, go to www.mohawknationnews.com  More stories at MNN Archives.  Address:  Box 991, Kahnawake [Quebec, Canada] J0Lthahoketoteh@mohawknationnews.com for original Mohawk music visit thahoketoteh.ws
Harper Hates Everyone:
We learnt the one mind from the wolf. With the one mind, we can never be defeated.
We learned the one mind from the wolf. With the one mind, we can never be defeated.
“Tribal councils are small pox blankets, inimical to indigenous peoples traditional means of self-determination”. Dr. Richard Boylan.


http://mohawknationnews.com/blog/2015/05/20/s-s-good-message-power-peace/

Santa Barbara oil spill now stretches for 9 miles



Aerial photo of skimmer and oil spill courtesy of Joint Operation Center.


Santa Barbara oil spill now stretches for 9 miles 

by Dan Bacher
Censored News

State and federal government crews continue to monitor the clean up of a big oil spill off the coast of Santa Barbara as the size of the disaster has expanded. 

The spill from a ruptured pipeline owned by Plains All American Pipeline expanded overnight from 4 miles long to two slicks stretching 9 miles along the coast, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. The pipeline carries crude oil from to Flores to Gaviota.

Zapatista Comandanta Miriam on the Rights of Women

Comandanta Miriam. May 6, 2015

Comandanta Miriam


Good evening compañeros and compañeras.
I also have the chance to talk to you a bit about what the situation was for women prior to 1994.
Women suffered through a very sad situation since the arrival of the conquistadors. They stole our land and took our language, our culture. This is how the domination of caciquismo [local despotism] and landowners came into being alongside a triple exploitation, humiliation, discrimination, marginalization, mistreatment, and inequality.
The fucking bosses had us as if they were our owners; they sent us to do all the work on the haciendas, without caring if we had children, husbands, or if we were sick. They never asked if we were sick; if we didn’t make it to work, they sent their servant or slave to leave the corn in front of the kitchen so that we would make tortillas for them.
Much time passed like this, with us working in the bosses’ house. We ground the salt because the salt then was not the same as it is now, now it comes finely ground. The salt we used before came in large balls, and we women had to grind it. Women also ground the salt for the livestock, and shelled coffee when it was coffee harvest time. If we started at 6 in the morning, we finished at 5 in the evening. Women had to keep preparing the bags of coffee throughout the whole day.
This is how the women worked. Women were mistreated in their work, carrying water and all of that and paid miserably; they were only given a little handful of salt or a handful of ground coffee, that was the payment given to the women.
Years passed and women suffered like this. And when our babies cried and we nursed them, we were yelled at, made fun of, insulted physically; they said that we didn’t know anything, that we were useless, that we were a bother to them. They didn’t respect us and they used us as if we were objects.
They did whatever they wanted to a woman; they chose the pretty women or the pretty girls as their lovers, and left children all over the place; they didn’t care that the women suffered, they treated them like animals, with their children growing up without a father.
They sold us as if we were commodities during the acasillamiento[i]; there was never rest for us women.
I’m going to talk a little bit about the acasillamiento. Acasillamiento refers to when people go to the haciendas or ranches with their families and stay there and work for the boss. The men were the ones who did the work of planting coffee, cleaning the coffee fields, harvesting the coffee, clearing the pastures, planting the grass, all this work, taking care of the corn and bean fields. The men did this work for the boss.
Apart from this, there is another thing I could tell you about the acasillamiento, which are the mozos or slaves there, men and women who are always going to live on the hacienda. Those men or women that are slaves or mozos, who live at the hacienda, are men and women that sometimes don’t have family. For example, a family comes just to work on the hacienda, and sometimes the dad and mom get sick and die and the children are orphaned. The boss takes these children and raises them on the hacienda. And what do these children do? Its not like the bosses adopt them as an adoptive child, but rather as a slave. Those children grow and this is the work they are given: if the boss has a pet, or pets, such as a dog, a monkey, or some kind of animal, the boss has the mozo take care of it, care for the animal. Wherever the monkey goes, that’s where the child is; they have to take care of it, bathe it, clean where it sleeps. That’s how it works.
Later, when the boss has a party—because before the priests would come to the large haciendas of the bosses and baptize their children, or for a birthday, or to perform a marriage ceremony for his daughters—and afterwards they would have parties and tell the mozos to guard the door. They would have the mozo watch the door while they were celebrating with their colleagues and friends. The mozo guards the door, he can’t let even a dog come into where they are partying, and he has to be there all day, for as long as the boss’s party keeps going.
And the women slaves were the ones who made the food, washed the dishes, and took care of the boss’s son, or the children of the boss’s friends.
That is how the people on the haciendas lived, and they didn’t get to eat what was eaten at the gatherings; they had to drink pozol[ii] if there was pozol, eat beans if there were beans. That was all they ate, meanwhile the boss ate the good stuff, but with his friends.
Later, when the boss wanted to go to the city, from his hacienda to a city that is, say, a 6-day walk, themozo would go along. If the boss had children—sometimes the children are disabled—the mozo had to carry the boss’s child to the city. And if the boss’s wife came to the hacienda, the mozo goes again and carries the child back again.
And when they harvested coffee, in any harvest on the hacienda, the mozo had to be tending to the mules. I don’t know if you know about horses, but the mozo had to saddle and unsaddle the boss’s horse, herd the cattle, and take the loads to the city where the boss lives. If he lives in Comitán the mozo had to go all the way to Comitán. He had to leave the hacienda and go as the mule-driver. This is how many enslaved men and women suffered during that time.
If there are fruit tree orchards inside the hacienda and one of them climbed up to pick some fruit, the bosses wouldn’t let them. They got them down by whipping them, I don’t know if you know how the lash works; they would hit them with it. They can’t pick fruit without the boss’s permission because the entire harvest was to be taken to the city. This is how the men and women suffered.
After so much suffering by women and the exploitation during the acasillamiento, the men started realizing how their women were being mistreated. Some thought it better to leave the hacienda. One by one they started leaving and taking refuge in the mountains because these hill lands were not claimed by the plantation owners. So they took refuge there. They thought it better to leave so that the women would not continue to suffer on the hacienda.
After awhile in the mountains—and many spent a long time there—they realized that it was better to join together and form a community, and that’s how they came to live that way. They got together, talked, and formed a community where they could live. That is how they formed the community.
But again, once they were living in the communities, those ideas that came from the boss or the acasilladowere brought in. It’s as if the men drug these bad ideas along with them and applied them inside the house. They acted like the little boss of the house. It’s not true that the women were liberated then, because the men became the little bosses of the house.
And once again the women stayed at home as if it was a jail. Women didn’t go out; they were shut in their houses once again.
When girls are born, we are not welcomed into the world because we are women; when a little girl was born, it is as if we were not loved. But if a boy was born, the men celebrated and were content because they are men. They brought this bad custom from the bosses. That’s how it was for a long time. When girls were born they acted as if women were useless, and if a boy was born, as if they could do all of the work.
But one good thing they did was that they did not lose the memory of how to form a community; they began to name community representatives and hold meetings and gatherings together. It was good that this idea was not lost, it wasn’t taken away and it came to life again. The bosses and the conquest wanted to make this culture disappear, but the bosses were wrong, because the people could still form their community.
Another thing is that the man gives the orders in the house and the women obey what he says. And if he tells you that you’re going to get married, you have get married. He’s not going to ask you if you want to get married to the man who came to ask for your hand; your father already accepted the liquor they offered, he drank it already and this obligates you to go with this man that you do not love.
This is how we came to suffer once again with our husbands because they told us that women are only useful in the kitchen, or to take care of their husbands, or to take care of the children. The men didn’t hold their children; they didn’t support the women. They only gave you the child, and then who cares how the child is raised. And—I’m going to talk about how it really was for years—we women often say that a baby was born every year, every year and a half, growing up like a little staircase, every year or year and a half there is another one. But the father didn’t care if his wife was suffering because she had to carry firewood, plant the cornfield, clean the house, sweep, take care of the animals, wash the clothes, take care of the children, change the diapers, and all of that. All of that was women’s work.
This is why we say that we suffered triple exploitation as women. Women had to be awake and in the kitchen at 3 or 4 in the morning, depending on how much time the men needed to get to their fields. The women had to get up early to make pozol, coffee, and breakfast for the men. The men go to work, and when they come back in the afternoon they want the water for their bath to have been carried up to the house already and be ready for them to bathe. The men bathe and then leave the house to walk around, to play, and the women are once again stuck at home the whole day, until the night—around this time right now—the women are still awake; they don’t go to sleep until 8.
So we were really suffering. The men didn’t care if you were sick, or how you felt, they didn’t ask—that’s just how it was. That is how women really lived; we’re not lying because that is how we lived.
When you would go to church or a ceremonial center for a festival, and women did go sometimes, you had to lower your head. You couldn’t raise your head, you had to walk with your head bowed, without turning to the sides, and covering your head with the rebozo [shawl] like this, so that just your face shows.
A lot of time went by like this, during which men dragged along these bad ideas, these bad learnings. That is how it happened, compañeros. As if we were nothing. As if only the men could be authorities, only the men could go into the street and participate.
There was no school. Later on in some communities there was school, but we didn’t go because we were women; they didn’t let us go to school because if we went they’d say that we only went to school to find a husband. And that it was better to learn to work in the kitchen because if we were indeed going to have a husband, we needed to learn how to take care of him.
And when our husband hit us, when he insulted us, we couldn’t complain. If we asked for help from the other institutions of the bad government they were much worse because they defended the men, and said the men are right; and so we remained silent, humiliated, and embarrassed at being women.
We didn’t have the right to come to meetings to participate, and they said that we were stupid, useless, and that we weren’t worth anything. They left us at home. We did not have freedom.
There was no health care. Even where there were clinics and hospitals that belonged to the bad government, they wouldn’t see us because we didn’t know how to speak Spanish. And sometimes we had to return to our homes, and many women and children died of curable diseases; we weren’t worth anything to them, and they discriminated against us because we were indigenous. They said that we were just dirty barefoot indians, and we couldn’t enter the clinics or hospitals. They wouldn’t let us, they only took care of people with money.
All this we suffered in our own flesh. We never had the opportunity to say what we felt for many years, because of the teachings of the conquistadores and the bad governments.
That is all, compañeros. Another compa will continue.
[i] Indicates the time period in which the caciques, or local land bosses, held great expanses of land and had almost total power over the indigenous workers in a kind of indebted servitude.
[ii] Pozol is a drink made from ground maize mixed with water and often consumed in the Mexican countryside as a midmorning or midday meal.

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